Thursday, July 07, 2011

eye candy for weavers

Yesterday, a totally unexpected trip in the countryside ended in glory
with a visit to Tessitura De Martini where we were welcomed by the owner, Stefania, who showed us around.

Everywhere I looked there was something interesting to see - every bobbin, every discarded thread or piece of fabric, everything!
They were preparing the warp (43m) for a batch of orange cashmere scarves.

In one room they have a loom for the smaller production, while in the bigger one they have two Jacquard looms for silk damask.
But that's for the next post!



















10 comments:

Margreet said...

This looks very interesting. Yes, it must have felt like being in a sweetshop for weavers ;-)

Rachael said...

In the first picture on the shelf there is a row of bobbin-type wheels. some with yarn, most without...what are those for? Are they just a sort of swift?

Meg in Nelson said...

Oh. My. God. And you didn't faint? Did you hyperventilate? Because I am, over here.

Meg in Nelson said...

Oh, not fair. Their website is Flash base, and I can't copy/paste the text to to translate.

Has the mill existed since 1500 or are they recreating the textiles from as long ago as 1500? How big is it? Many employees? Did you shoot the exterior, too? Oh, so much I want to know!!!!!

Holly said...

I wanna go there!

Hilary said...

What a great bird's eye view of another weaver's work.
Thanks for this.

Pracownia na Kaszubach said...

super !!! :)

sampling said...

What a wonderful place to visit! I am hyperventilating too!
And such fine fabric.....

Donatella said...

Rachael, silk skeins are unwound on the swifts and then wound again on wooden bobbins for the warp.
That tool is only for yarns that come in skeins. Another machine does the same with yarn from cones.

Meg,
when I recovered I asked a billion questions and now of course I'd ask a billion more. There were only three women working there: Stefania, her mother and a young worker. It's always been a family business, set up by Stefania's grandfather.
And I didn't shoot the exterior (too concentrated on the interior I suppose!) - ok, I have to go back there! This is one of those must-see places , whenever you decide to visit Italy!

Meg in Nelson said...

Imagine the quality and the quantity of work, possibly done but just three people!! The mind boggles at the possibility of what one human person can do, and what three of them can do together. I'm still so much in awe, Doni.